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Arkansas 47th in National Child Well-Being Rankings

Arkansas 47th in National Child Well-Being Rankings

GARLAND COUNTY, Ark. (AP/KTHV) - High child poverty in Arkansas keeps the state pinned to the bottom of national rankings in measurements of child well-being, according to the 2011 KIDS COUNT Data Book. The state moved up one position to 47th for overall child well-being, despite substantial gains seen in the lives of Arkansas teens.

With an overall child poverty rate of 27 percent, the state is still struggling to move up in the yearly rankings.

New Cardiologist joins Mercy in Hot Springs

New Cardiologist joins Mercy in Hot Springs

Interventional cardiologist Dr. Srinivas Vengala has joined St. Joseph’s Mercy and the Mercy Heart and Vascular Center.

Dr. Vengala comes to Mercy after spending the past three years in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. At UAB, he was a fellow and assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease.

As an interventional cardiologist, Dr. Vengala deals with catheter-based treatment of heart diseases. Some of the advantages of minimally invasive interventional cardiology are decreased pain, less risk of infection, avoidance of large scars and shorter post-operative recovery times.

Dr. Vengala is also adding to the services previously offered by the Mercy Heart and Vascular Center.

Home Health Care franchise expands

Home Health Care franchise expands

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. -- Mike Scott opened his third franchise of BrightStar, a home health care and medical care staffing provider, last month in Hot Springs. Scott already has locations in Little Rock and North Little Rock.

In addition to providing home health care for older and disabled adults and hospital staffing, BrightStar provides anywhere from one- to 24-hour in-home child care. BrightStar also provides out-of-home child care for trips or outings.

Also among the company's many services are respite care, shopping and transportation, and companion service.

For more information, call (501) 224-3737.

(www.arkansasbusiness.com Copyright 2011 Arkansas Business. All rights reserved.)

How to handle heat emergencies

How to handle heat emergencies

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. While Arkansans are used to hot summers, the recent weeks of temperatures with heat indies in the triple digits, has been a stamina test for most.  Now, with the addition of air temperatures exceeding 100 degrees forecast for the week, additional attention is asked for what could be life threatening heat related concerns.

With an understanding that illness caused by too much heat or too much activity in the sun can be easily dismissed, as the person being affected may be unaware they are nearing points of concern, the following signals and care for heat conditions are as follows:

Signals of Heat Emergencies...

  • Heat exhaustion: Cool, moist, pale, or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea or vomiting; dizziness; and exhaustion.

Protect yourself from the threat of West Nile virus

Protect yourself from the threat of West Nile virus

Positive lab results for human cases of West Nile virus (WNV) have been reported in Texas and Mississippi so far this year, and the virus is probably on its way to Arkansas, health officials say.

The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) has not recorded any cases of WNV infection so far this year, but ADH officials say that it is only a matter of time.

 According to James Phillips, MD, Infectious Disease Branch Chief at ADH, it is not surprising to see illness from mosquitoes at this time of year. “We are concerned that people may have forgotten that WNV is a problem in Arkansas, but the fact is, we have had the greatest number of cases in the months of August and September over the last few years,” Phillips said.

“We want people to remember to take their mosquito repellent with them when they go outside this summer,” Phillips added.

In Arkansas for 2010 there were seven cases of WNV and one fatality recorded.

Mohandas joins Mercy

Mohandas joins Mercy

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – Bhavna Mohandas, MD, has joined the Mercy Heart and Vascular Center as an Invasive Cardiologist after completing her residency and fellowship at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock.

“I liked St. Joseph’s Mercy and the Cardiology Clinic when I came here to see everyone. The cardiology group is excellent and I felt that it would be a perfect fit for me,” she said.

Dr. Mohandas grew up in India and attended the medical college at Trivandrum University of Kerala. After earning a degree in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Ohio, she completed her medical training in Arkansas.

She is an invasive cardiologist, a doctor who specializes in using diagnostic and therapeutic tools inserted directly into the patient’s body to treat heart disease.

How sodium, potassium affect your health

How sodium, potassium affect your health

A new study shows that a diet high in sodium and low in potassium doubles the risk of dying from a heart attack and is associated with a 50% increased risk of death from any cause.  The study recorded the diet of 12,000 U.S.