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Minimize your allergies this fall

Minimize your allergies this fall

Do you find your allergy symptoms are worse from mid-August through September?  The primary culprit of fall allergies is ragweed pollen.  A ragweed plant only lives one season, but it packs a powerful punch.  Symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, also called “hay fever,” can have a major impact not just on a person’s quality of life, but also their ability to function well at school and work.

Proper diagnosis is the first step in managing your symptoms.  An allergist/immunologist can diagnose and treat ragweed and other allergies, enhancing quality-of-life for those who suffer, according to the Arkansas Allergy & Asthma Clinic in Little Rock.

The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology estimates that 36 million Americans suffer from seasonal allergies.

Minimize your allergies this fall

Minimize your allergies this fall

Do you find your allergy symptoms are worse from mid-August through September?  The primary culprit of fall allergies is ragweed pollen.  A ragweed plant only lives one season, but it packs a powerful punch.  Symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, also called “hay fever,” can have a major impact not just on a person’s quality of life, but also their ability to function well at school and work.

Proper diagnosis is the first step in managing your symptoms.  An allergist/immunologist can diagnose and treat ragweed and other allergies, enhancing quality-of-life for those who suffer, according to the Arkansas Allergy & Asthma Clinic in Little Rock.

The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology estimates that 36 million Americans suffer from seasonal allergies.

Doctor returns to Arkansas

Doctor returns to Arkansas

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – Dr. Donald Blagdon is back in Arkansas.

After spending the past eight years in Maine, Dr. Blagdon has joined St. Joseph’s Mercy Clinic in Hot Springs as a family practice physician. He’s done a little bit of everything in his years as a physician.

“I’m going on 30 years in family practice. I’ve done obstetrics, pediatrics, emergency room, even house calls back in Maine,” Dr. Blagdon said. “I was always interested in Gerontology and was a nursing home director for many of those 30 years.”

This is the English Harbour East, Newfoundland, Canada native’s second tour of duty in Arkansas. He previously worked at Ouachita County Medical Center in Camden.

“I was born on the island of Newfoundland in far eastern Canada, about as far east as you can get pretty much,” Dr. Blagdon said.

Dr. Blagdon attended the Medical School at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John’s.

Arkansas 47th in National Child Well-Being Rankings

Arkansas 47th in National Child Well-Being Rankings

GARLAND COUNTY, Ark. (AP/KTHV) - High child poverty in Arkansas keeps the state pinned to the bottom of national rankings in measurements of child well-being, according to the 2011 KIDS COUNT Data Book. The state moved up one position to 47th for overall child well-being, despite substantial gains seen in the lives of Arkansas teens.

With an overall child poverty rate of 27 percent, the state is still struggling to move up in the yearly rankings.

New Cardiologist joins Mercy in Hot Springs

New Cardiologist joins Mercy in Hot Springs

Interventional cardiologist Dr. Srinivas Vengala has joined St. Joseph’s Mercy and the Mercy Heart and Vascular Center.

Dr. Vengala comes to Mercy after spending the past three years in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. At UAB, he was a fellow and assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease.

As an interventional cardiologist, Dr. Vengala deals with catheter-based treatment of heart diseases. Some of the advantages of minimally invasive interventional cardiology are decreased pain, less risk of infection, avoidance of large scars and shorter post-operative recovery times.

Dr. Vengala is also adding to the services previously offered by the Mercy Heart and Vascular Center.

Home Health Care franchise expands

Home Health Care franchise expands

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. -- Mike Scott opened his third franchise of BrightStar, a home health care and medical care staffing provider, last month in Hot Springs. Scott already has locations in Little Rock and North Little Rock.

In addition to providing home health care for older and disabled adults and hospital staffing, BrightStar provides anywhere from one- to 24-hour in-home child care. BrightStar also provides out-of-home child care for trips or outings.

Also among the company's many services are respite care, shopping and transportation, and companion service.

For more information, call (501) 224-3737.

(www.arkansasbusiness.com Copyright 2011 Arkansas Business. All rights reserved.)

How to handle heat emergencies

How to handle heat emergencies

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. While Arkansans are used to hot summers, the recent weeks of temperatures with heat indies in the triple digits, has been a stamina test for most.  Now, with the addition of air temperatures exceeding 100 degrees forecast for the week, additional attention is asked for what could be life threatening heat related concerns.

With an understanding that illness caused by too much heat or too much activity in the sun can be easily dismissed, as the person being affected may be unaware they are nearing points of concern, the following signals and care for heat conditions are as follows:

Signals of Heat Emergencies...

  • Heat exhaustion: Cool, moist, pale, or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea or vomiting; dizziness; and exhaustion.